Gator Reading

Growing Acceptance Through Organized Reading

GATOR (Growing Acceptance Through Organized Reading) is a campus-wide program engaging students, faculty and staff in small group introspective conversations about equity. Participants identify and discuss unintended barriers and formulate actionable strategies to reduce obstacles and bolster student success.

Each semester, we gather in Gator Hall for three sessions to discuss equity and a common reading.

For more information, contact either Co-Chairs of the GATOR Committee, Alicia Hodge (Alicia.hodge@brazosport.edu)  or Kimberly Milligan (Kimberly.milligan@brazosport.edu).

Spring 2018

Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy by Emily Bazelon

Cover of the book STICKS AND STONES with an image of four small lockers and six combindation locks.Being a teenager has never been easy, but in recent years, with the rise of the Internet and social media, it has become exponentially more challenging. Bullying, once thought of as the province of queen bees and goons, has taken on new, complex, and insidious forms, as parents and educators know all too well.
 
No writer is better poised to explore this territory than Emily Bazelon, who has established herself as a leading voice on the social and legal aspects of teenage drama. In Sticks and Stones, she brings readers on a deeply researched, clear-eyed journey into the ever-shifting landscape of teenage meanness and its sometimes devastating consequences. The result is an indispensable book that takes us from school cafeterias to courtrooms to the offices of Facebook, the website where so much teenage life, good and bad, now unfolds.
 
Along the way, Bazelon defines what bullying is and, just as important, what it is not. She explores when intervention is essential and when kids should be given the freedom to fend for themselves. She also dispels persistent myths: that girls bully more than boys, that online and in-person bullying are entirely distinct, that bullying is a common cause of suicide, and that harsh criminal penalties are an effective deterrent. Above all, she believes that to deal with the problem, we must first understand it.
 
Blending keen journalistic and narrative skills, Bazelon explores different facets of bullying through the stories of three young people who found themselves caught in the thick of it. Thirteen-year-old Monique endured months of harassment and exclusion before her mother finally pulled her out of school. Jacob was threatened and physically attacked over his sexuality in eighth grade—and then sued to protect himself and change the culture of his school. Flannery was one of six teens who faced criminal charges after a fellow student’s suicide was blamed on bullying and made international headlines. With grace and authority, Bazelon chronicles how these kids’ predicaments escalated, to no one’s benefit, into community-wide wars. Cutting through the noise, misinformation, and sensationalism, she takes us into schools that have succeeded in reducing bullying and examines their successful strategies. The result is a groundbreaking book that will help parents, educators, and teens themselves better understand what kids are going through today and what can be done to help them through it.

Campus Library has a limited number of books that students to check out.

Spring 2018 Sessions

Length

Tuesday

Wednesday

Times

Discuss Equity & Bullying

90 min

Feb. 6th

Feb. 7th

9:30, 11, 12:30, 4, 7

Sticks & Stones
Part I & II

60 min

March 6th

March 7th

9:30, 11, 12:30, 4, 7

Sticks & Stones
Part III & IV

60 min

April 3rd

April 4th

9:30, 11, 12:30, 4, 7

Fall 2018

GRIT: The POWER of PASSION and PERSEVERANCE by Angela Duckworth

GRIT Book CoverIn this instant New York Times bestseller, pioneering psychologist Angela Duckworth shows anyone striving to succeed—be it parents, students, educators, athletes, or business people—that the secret to outstanding achievement is not talent but a special blend of passion and persistence she calls “grit.”

Drawing on her own powerful story as the daughter of a scientist who frequently noted her lack of “genius,” Duckworth, now a celebrated researcher and professor, describes her early eye-opening stints in teaching, business consulting, and neuroscience, which led to the hypothesis that what really drives success is not “genius” but a unique combination of passion and long-term perseverance.

In Grit, she takes readers into the field to visit cadets struggling through their first days at West Point, teachers working in some of the toughest schools, and young finalists in the National Spelling Bee. She also mines fascinating insights from history and shows what can be gleaned from modern experiments in peak performance. Finally, she shares what she’s learned from interviewing dozens of high achievers—from JP Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon to New Yorker cartoon editor Bob Mankoff to Seattle Seahawks Coach Pete Carroll.

Winningly personal, insightful, and even life-changing, Grit is a book about what goes through your head when you fall down, and how that—not talent or luck—makes all the difference.

Campus Library has a limited number of books that students to check out.

Fall 2018 Sessions

Length

Tuesday

Wednesday

Times

Equity Discussion

90 min

Sept. 18th 

Sept. 19th 

9:30, 11, 12:30, 4, 7

GRIT
Chapter 1 - Chapter 7

60 min

Oct. 16th

Oct. 17th 

9:30, 11, 12:30, 4, 7

GRIT        
Chapter 8 - Chapter 13

60 min

Nov. 13th

Nov. 14th 

9:30, 11, 12:30, 4, 7

If you would like to share the student flyer, please find that documents here:

Spring 2019

An Invisible Thread by Laura Schroff

The Invisible ThreadThis inspirational New York Times bestseller chronicles the lifelong friendship between a busy sales executive and a disadvantaged young boy, and how both of their lives were changed by what began as one small gesture of kindness. “A straightforward tale of kindness and paying it forward in 1980s New York….an uplifting reminder that small gestures matter” (Kirkus Reviews).

Stopping was never part of the plan...

She was a successful ad sales rep in Manhattan. He was a homeless, eleven-year-old panhandler on the street. He asked for spare change; she kept walking. But then something stopped her in her tracks, and she went back. And she continued to go back, again and again. They met up nearly every week for years and built an unexpected, life-changing friendship that has today spanned almost three decades.

Whatever made me notice him on that street corner so many years ago is clearly something that cannot be extinguished, no matter how relentless the forces aligned against it. Some may call it spirit. Some may call it heart. It drew me to him, as if we were bound by some invisible, unbreakable thread. And whatever it is, it binds us still.

Campus Library has a limited number of books that students to check out

Spring 2019 Sessions

Length

Tuesday

Wednesday

Times

Equity Discussion

90 min

Feb. 5th

Feb. 6th

9:30, 11, 12:30, 4, 7

An Invisible Thread
TBD

60 min

March 5th

March 6th

9:30, 11, 12:30, 4, 7

An Invisible Thread            
TBD

60 min

April 16th

April 17th

9:30, 11, 12:30, 4, 7

If you would like to share the student flyer, please find that documents here:

Scholarship Opportunities

Select image for sholarship guidelines and scoring rubric information


Fall 2018 Submission Deadline

Dec. 3rd, 2018, no later than 11:59 p.m.


 Spring 2019 Submission Deadline

April 25th, 2019, no later than 11:59 p.m.